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A Spitzer Study of Dusty Disks around Nearby, Young Stars
We have obtained Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS (Multiband ImagingPhotometer for Spitzer) observations of 39 A- through M-type dwarfs,with estimated ages between 12 and 600 Myr; IRAC observations for asubset of 11 stars; and follow-up CSO SHARC II 350 μm observationsfor a subset of two stars. None of the objects observed with IRACpossess infrared excesses at 3.6-8.0 μm however, seven objectsobserved with MIPS possess 24 and/or 70 μm excesses. Four objects(κ Phe, HD 92945, HD 119124, and AU Mic), with estimated ages12-200 Myr, possess strong 70 μm excesses, >=100% larger thantheir predicted photospheres, and no 24 μm excesses, suggesting thatthe dust grains in these systems are cold. One object (HD 112429)possesses moderate 24 and 70 μm excesses with a color temperature,Tgr=100 K. Two objects (α1 Lib and HD177724) possess such strong 24 μm excesses that their 12, 24, and 70μm fluxes cannot be self-consistently modeled using a modifiedblackbody despite a 70 μm excess >2 times greater than thephotosphere around α1 Lib. The strong 24 μm excessesmay be the result of emission in spectral features, as observed towardthe Hale-Bopp star HD 69830.

Can Life Develop in the Expanded Habitable Zones around Red Giant Stars?
We present some new ideas about the possibility of life developingaround subgiant and red giant stars. Our study concerns the temporalevolution of the habitable zone. The distance between the star and thehabitable zone, as well as its width, increases with time as aconsequence of stellar evolution. The habitable zone moves outward afterthe star leaves the main sequence, sweeping a wider range of distancesfrom the star until the star reaches the tip of the asymptotic giantbranch. Currently there is no clear evidence as to when life actuallyformed on the Earth, but recent isotopic data suggest life existed atleast as early as 7×108 yr after the Earth was formed.Thus, if life could form and evolve over time intervals from5×108 to 109 yr, then there could behabitable planets with life around red giant stars. For a 1Msolar star at the first stages of its post-main-sequenceevolution, the temporal transit of the habitable zone is estimated to beseveral times 109 yr at 2 AU and around 108 yr at9 AU. Under these circumstances life could develop at distances in therange 2-9 AU in the environment of subgiant or giant stars, and in thefar distant future in the environment of our own solar system. After astar completes its first ascent along the red giant branch and the Heflash takes place, there is an additional stable period of quiescent Hecore burning during which there is another opportunity for life todevelop. For a 1 Msolar star there is an additional109 yr with a stable habitable zone in the region from 7 to22 AU. Space astronomy missions, such as proposed for the TerrestrialPlanet Finder (TPF) and Darwin, that focus on searches for signatures oflife on extrasolar planets, should also consider the environments ofsubgiants and red giant stars as potentially interesting sites forunderstanding the development of life. We performed a preliminaryevaluation of the difficulty of interferometric observations of planetsaround red giant stars compared to a main-sequence star environment. Weshow that pathfinder missions for TPF and Darwin, such as Eclipse andFKSI, have sufficient angular resolution and sensitivity to search forhabitable planets around some of the closest evolved stars of thesubgiant and red giant class.

Lithium and rotation in F and G dwarfs and subgiants
Lithium abundances have been determined in 127 F and G Pop I stars basedon new measurements of the equivalent width of the lambda 6707 ÅLi I line from their high resolution CCD spectra. Distances and absolutemagnitudes of these stars have been obtained from the HipparcosCatalogue and their masses and ages derived, enabling us to investigatethe behaviour of lithium as a function of these parameters. Based ontheir location on the HR diagram superposed on theoretical evolutionarytracks, the sample of the stars has been chosen to ensure that they havemore or less completed their Li depletion on the main sequence. A largespread in the Li abundances is found at any given effective temperatureespecially in the already spun down late F and early G stars. Thisspread persists even if the ``Li-dip'' stars that have evolved from themain sequence temperature interval 6500-6800 K are excluded. Stars inthe mass range up to 2 M/Msun when divided into threemetallicity groups show a linear correlation between Li abundance andmass, albeit with a large dispersion around it which is not fullyaccounted for by age either. The large depletions and the observedspread in Li are in contrast to the predictions of the standard stellarmodel calculations and suggest that they are aided by non-standardprocesses depending upon variables besides mass, age and metallicity.The present study was undertaken to examine, in particular, the effectsof rotation on the depletion of Li. No one-to-one correlation is foundbetween the Li abundance and the present projected rotational velocity.Instead the observed abundances seem to be dictated by the rotationalhistory of the star. However, it is noted that even this interpretationis subject to the inherent limitation in the measurement of the observedLi EQW for large rotational velocities.Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymousftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/409/251

CCD Speckle Observations of Binary Stars from the Southern Hemisphere. III. Differential Photometry
Two hundred seventy-two magnitude difference measures of 135 double starsystems are presented. The results are derived from speckle observationsusing the Bessel V and R passbands and a fast readout CCD camera.Observations were taken at two 60 cm telescopes, namely the Helen SawyerHogg Telescope, formerly at Las Campanas, Chile, and the Lowell-TololoTelescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. Thedata analysis method is presented and, in comparing the results to thoseof Hipparcos as well as to recent results using adaptive optics, we findvery good agreement. Overall, the measurement precision appears to bedependent on seeing and other factors but is generally in the range of0.10-0.15 mag for single observations under favorable observingconditions. In four cases, multiple observations in both V and R allowedfor the derivation of component V-R colors with uncertainties of 0.11mag or less. Spectral types are assigned and preliminary effectivetemperatures are estimated in these cases.

Detection of moving clusters by a method of cinematic pairs.
Not Available

Dynamical Stability of Triple Stars
The dynamical stability of 38 observed hierarchical triple stars withknown orbital elements of the internal and external binary subsystemsand component masses is considered. Four different criteria of dynamicalstability are used. The observed stability parameters and their criticalvalues are calculated by taking into account errors in the orbitalelements and component masses. Most triple systems are stable. Accordingto some criteria, several triple stars (ADS440, xi Tau, lambda Tau,ADS3358, VV Ori, ADS10157, HZ Her, Gliese 795, ADS15971, and ADS16138)may be dynamically unstable. This result is probably associated withunreliability of the empirical stability criteria and/or with errors inthe observed quantities.

ICCD Speckle Observations of Binary Stars. XXIII. Measurements during 1982-1997 from Six Telescopes, with 14 New Orbits
We present 2017 observations of 1286 binary stars, observed by means ofspeckle interferometry using six telescopes over a 15 year period from1982 April to 1997 June. These measurements constitute the 23dinstallment in CHARA's speckle program at 2 to 4 m class telescopes andinclude the second major collection of measurements from the MountWilson 100 inch (2.5 m) Hooker Telescope. Orbital elements are alsopresented for 14 systems, seven of which have had no previouslypublished orbital analyses.

Two-colour photometry for 9473 components of close Hipparcos double and multiple stars
Using observations obtained with the Tycho instrument of the ESAHipparcos satellite, a two-colour photometry is produced for componentsof more than 7 000 Hipparcos double and multiple stars with angularseparations 0.1 to 2.5 arcsec. We publish 9473 components of 5173systems with separations above 0.3 arcsec. The majority of them did nothave Tycho photometry in the Hipparcos catalogue. The magnitudes arederived in the Tycho B_T and V_T passbands, similar to the Johnsonpassbands. Photometrically resolved components of the binaries withstatistically significant trigonometric parallaxes can be put on an HRdiagram, the majority of them for the first time. Based on observationsmade with the ESA Hipparcos satellite.

Nova Velorum 1999
IAUC 7176 available at Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams.

Spectroscopic binary orbits from photoelectric radial velocities. Paper 148: HR 7955
Not Available

Infrared Space Observatory Photometric Search of Main-Sequence Stars for Vega-Type Systems
We obtained 3.6-20 μm photometry of 38 bright [IRAS F_nu(12μm)>0.7 Jy] main-sequence stars with the Infrared SpaceObservatory (ISO). Observations were conducted with the ISOPHOTinstrument, in the single-pointing photometry mode, through filters at3.6, 11.5, and 20.0 mum. We searched for excess (Vega-type) emissionfrom dust at temperatures >~100 K, located at ~1-60 AU from thestars. We thus sampled dust at warm, terrestrial material temperaturesand at cool (~100 K) temperatures of possible Kuiper Belt-type regionsin these systems. We detected 20 μm excesses from ~14% of oursources, but we did not detect 11.5 μm excesses from any of them. Wepresent single-temperature blackbody models of the location and densityof dust emission around 10 stars, two of them (29 Cyg and Gl 816) withexcesses newly reported here. We make a thorough comparison of ISO andIRAS data on our target stars and propose a new calibration procedurefor ISOPHOT staring measurements at 3.6, 11.5, and 20 mum.

On the Evolution of Close Triple Stars That Produce Type IA Supernovae
Current observational estimates suggest that ~30% of all binary starsare in triple systems. In ~70% of these, the enclosed binary is closeenough that the primary in the binary can evolve to fill its Roche lobe.In ~10%-20%, the third, more distant component can evolve to fill itsRoche lobe, leading to configurations inaccessible to isolated binarystars. Triple stars are unstable if the ratio of the orbital period ofthe enclosed binary to the period of the third component exceeds acritical value. Hence, an increase in the orbital period of the binarydue to conservative mass transfer between components or to wind massloss from the binary can destabilize an initially stable triple system,causing it to decompose into a rapidly moving single star and an evolvedbinary recoiling in the opposite direction with a velocity largecompared with velocities typical of primordial binaries. To highlightthe different possibilities inherent in triple-star evolution, wediscuss qualitatively several possible scenarios whereby triple starswith component masses in the range 1-10 M_solar can evolve into Type Iasupernovae, which we assume to be explosions of merging carbon-oxygen oroxygen-neon white dwarfs of total mass larger than 1.4 M_solar. Beforequantitative predictions of the likelihood of these scenarios can bemade, it is necessary to determine the initial distribution of youngtriple stars over their masses and orbital separations and to calculatethe reaction of the enclosed binary to matter transferred to it by thethird component when it fills its Roche lobe or supports a strong wind.

Visual binary orbits and masses POST HIPPARCOS
The parallaxes from Hipparcos are an important ingredient to derive moreaccurate masses for known orbital binaries, but in order to exploit theparallaxes fully, the orbital elements have to be known to similarprecision. The present work gives improved orbital elements for some 205systems by combining the Hipparcos astrometry with existing ground-basedobservations. The new solutions avoid the linearity constraints andomissions in the Hipparcos Catalog by using the intermediate TransitData which can be combined with ground-based observations in arbitarilycomplex orbital models. The new orbital elements and parallaxes give newmass-sum values together with realistic total error-estimates. To getindividual masses at least for main-sequence systems, the mass-ratioshave been generally estimated from theoretical isochrones and observedmagnitude-differences. For some 25 short-period systems, however, trueastrometric mass-ratios have been determined through the observedorbital curvature in the 3-year Hipparcos observation interval. Thefinal result is an observed `mass-luminosity relation' which falls closeto theoretical expectation, but with `outliers' due to undetectedmultiplicity or to composition- and age-effects in the nonuniformnear-star sample. Based in part on observations collected with the ESAHipparcos astrometry satellite. Tables~ 1, 3, 4 and 6 are also availablein electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr~(130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

A test of Hipparcos parallaxes on multiple stars.
Not Available

The ROSAT all-sky survey catalogue of optically bright main-sequence stars and subgiant stars
We present X-ray data for all main-sequence and subgiant stars ofspectral types A, F, G, and K and luminosity classes IV and V listed inthe Bright Star Catalogue that have been detected as X-ray sources inthe ROSAT all-sky survey; several stars without luminosity class arealso included. The catalogue contains 980 entries yielding an averagedetection rate of 32 percent. In addition to count rates, sourcedetection parameters, hardness ratios, and X-ray fluxes we also listX-ray luminosities derived from Hipparcos parallaxes. The catalogue isalso available in electronic form via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

Mass determination of astrometric binaries with Hipparcos. II. Selection of candidates and results
In a previous paper (\cite{Mar97}) we have shown that for double starswith orbital periods smaller than about 25 years, it was possible todetermine from the Hipparcos data, the mass ratio B of the components orthe difference between the mass and intensity ratios, beta -B, providedthe orbital elements of the relative orbit are available. From anextensive literature search we have selected 145 potential systems, ofwhich 46 yielded eventually a satisfactory solution. For eight systemswith the largest separations, the peculiarities of the natural directionassociated to the Hipparcos observations, the 'hippacentre', have beenfully exploited to derive the mass ratio of the components without anyadditional assumption. For the remaining 38, the derivation of the massratio was possible only by taking the magnitude difference between thetwo components from other sources. The parallax determinedsimultaneously, is then used to produce the individual masses of thecomponents. The astrophysical relevance of the results is discussed andwhen possible (17 systems) the masses are compared to ground-basedvalues.

CCD Speckle Observations of Binary Stars From the Southern Hemisphere
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1997AJ....114.2117H&db_key=AST

Spectroscopic and photometric behaviour of the FU Orionis variable Z Canis Majoris
We present optical and IR photometry, optical multi-dispersionspectroscopy, and IR spectrophotometry of the FU Ori variable Z CanisMajoris, obtained in the years 1984, 1985, 1989 and 1996. A comparisonof data obtained in 1984 and 1985 confirms that in 1985 Z CMa underwenta low-power eruption. The enhancement of H alpha emission line, thetransition of H beta and Fe ii lines from pure absorption to emissionwith or without a P~Cygni profile, the appearance of the He i 6678Angstrom absorption line, a radial velocity increase of about 30% of theP Cygni absorption components, and finally a 0.2-0.3 mag increase of IRluminosity, were all dinstinctive characteristics of this state. Furtherobservations in 1996 show that Z CMa is in a low-luminosity state at V =10.24 while the appearance of a double-peaked H alpha emission, with theblue component much weaker than the red one, is the most significantspectroscopic variation. Energy distributions in the range 0.4-5microns, obtained during 1984 and 1985 observational runs, are alsopresented. Based on observations collected at the European SouthernObservatory in La Silla, Chile.

MSC - a catalogue of physical multiple stars
The MSC catalogue contains data on 612 physical multiple stars ofmultiplicity 3 to 7 which are hierarchical with few exceptions. Orbitalperiods, angular separations and mass ratios are estimated for eachsub-system. Orbital elements are given when available. The catalogue canbe accessed through CDS (Strasbourg). Half of the systems are within 100pc from the Sun. The comparison of the periods of close and widesub-systems reveals that there is no preferred period ratio and allpossible combinations of periods are found. The distribution of thelogarithms of short periods is bimodal, probably due to observationalselection. In 82\% of triple stars the close sub-system is related tothe primary of a wide pair. However, the analysis of mass ratiodistribution gives some support to the idea that component masses areindependently selected from the Salpeter mass function. Orbits of wideand close sub-systems are not always coplanar, although thecorresponding orbital angular momentum vectors do show a weak tendencyof alignment. Some observational programs based on the MSC aresuggested. Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at theCDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

Mass determination of astrometric binaries with Hipparcos. I. Theory and simulation
The analysis of the observations of double stars made by the ESAsatellite Hipparcos has involved a very specific processing to derivethe relevant astrometric parameters. This required to distinguishbetween several categories of double stars according to the separationand orbital motion. We show that for close pairs with orbital periodless than about 20 years, the concept of photocentric orbit of anastrometric binary needs to be generalized to benefit fully from theaccuracy of Hipparcos. We introduce a point more naturally associatedwith the Hipparcos observations, the hippacentre, whose orbital path isnot longer similar to the relative keplerian orbit of the components,unlike that of the photocentre. For systems with separation larger thanabout 0.3", it is possible to determine separately the mass and theintensity ratio of the components from the absolute path of thehippacentre on the sky. For smaller separations the scale of thephotocentric orbit is recovered as a limiting case. The scope of thispaper is to set forth the principles of the method and to explore itspossibilities and limitations from extensive simulations. Based onobservations made by the ESA Hipparcos satellite.

On the nature of the AM phenomenon or on a stabilization and the tidal mixing in binaries. II. Metallicity and pseudo-synchronization.
We reveal sufficient evidences that for Am binaries the metallicitymight depend on their orbital periods, P_orb_, rather than on vsini. Inparticular, δm_1_ index seems to decrease with increasing orbitalperiod up to at least P_orb_=~50d, probably even up to P_orb_=~200d.This gives further support to our "tidal mixing + stabilization"hypothesis formulated in Part I. Moreover, while the most metallic Amstars seem to have rather large periods the slowest rotators are foundto exhibit substantially shorter P_orb_. A questioning eye is thus caston the generally adopted view that Am peculiarity is caused by asuppressed rotationally induced mixing in slowly rotating `single'stars. The observed anticorrelation between rotation and metallicity mayhave also other than the `textbook' explanation, namely being the resultof the correlation between metallicity and orbital period, as themajority of Am binaries are possibly synchronized. We further argue thatthere is a tendency in Am binaries towards pseudo-synchronization up toP_orb_=~35d. This has, however, no serious impact on our conclusionsfrom Part I; on the contrary, they still hold even if this effect istaken into account.

The Pulkovo Spectrophotometric Catalog of Bright Stars in the Range from 320 TO 1080 NM
A spectrophotometric catalog is presented, combining results of numerousobservations made by Pulkovo astronomers at different observing sites.The catalog consists of three parts: the first contains the data for 602stars in the spectral range of 320--735 nm with a resolution of 5 nm,the second one contains 285 stars in the spectral range of 500--1080 nmwith a resolution of 10 nm and the third one contains 278 stars combinedfrom the preceding catalogs in the spectral range of 320--1080 nm with aresolution of 10 nm. The data are presented in absolute energy unitsW/m(2) m, with a step of 2.5 nm and with an accuracy not lower than1.5--2.0%.

On the nature of the AM phenomenon or on a stabilization and the tidal mixing in binaries. I. Orbital periods and rotation.
The paper casts a questioning eye on the unique role of the diffusiveparticle transport mechanism in explaining the Am phenomenon and arguesthat the so-called tidal effects might be of great importance incontrolling diffusion processes. A short period cutoff at =~1.2d as wellas a 180-800d gap were found in the orbital period distribution (OPD) ofAm binaries. The existence of the former can be ascribed to the state ofthe primaries with the almost-filled Roche lobes. The latter couldresult from the combined effects of the diffusion, tidal mixing andstabilization processes. Because the tidal mixing might surpassdiffusion in the binaries with the orbital periods P_orb_ less thanseveral hundred days and might thus sustain the He convection zone,which would otherwise disappear, no Am stars should lie below thisboundary. The fact that they are nevertheless seen there implies theexistence of some stabilization mechanism (as, e.g., that recentlyproposed by Tassoul & Tassoul 1992) for the binaries with orbitalperiods less than 180d. Further evidence is given to the fact that theOPD for the Am and the normal binaries with an A4-F1 primary arecomplementary to each other, from which it stems that Am stars are closeto the main sequence. There are, however, indications that they haveslightly larger radii (2.1-3 Rsun_) than expected for theirspectral type. The generally accepted rotational velocity cutoff at=~100km/s is shown to be of little value when applied on Am binaries ashere it is not a single quantity but, in fact, a function of P_orb_whose shape is strikingly similar to that of the curves of constantmetallicity as ascertained from observations. This also leads to thewell known overlap in rotational velocities of the normal and Am starsfor 402.5d.We have exploited this empirical cutoff function to calibrate thecorresponding turbulent diffusion coefficient associated with tidalmixing, having found out that the computed form of the lines of constantturbulence fits qualitatively the empirical shape of the curves ofconstant metallicity. As for larger orbital periods(20d55km/s found by Burkhart(1979) would then be nothing but a manifestation of insufficientlypopulated corresponding area of larger P_orb_.

Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.
We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocitiesby Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogueof spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star,when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set ofIdentifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) ofthe CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the numberHIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number(Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) byDommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study hasbeen done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out theproblems we have had to deal with.

The MSSSO near-infrared photometric system
The JHKL photometric system currently used at the Mount Stromlo andSiding Spring Observatories (MSSSO) is described via an extensive listof standard-star values and filter transmission curves. At JHK thissystem is identical to the Mount Stromlo Observatory (MSO) systemdefined by Jones and Hyland (1982), except for small zero-pointdifferences which we impose here. Transformations are given between theMSSSO system and several near-infrared photometric systems in use inother observatories and the homogenized JHKL system proposed by Besselland Brett (1988).

High-resolution 6450-24500 A spectra of eta Carinae
We discuss high-resolution (Delta lambda/lambda approximately equals3000-8600) spectra of the central knot or 'star' in eta Car betweenapproximately 6450 and approximately 24,500 A, and of the Homunculusapproximately 7 sec southeast of the knot between approximately 6450 andapproximately 9250 A. A complete flux calibrated list of more than 170emission lines is provided longward of approximately 8780 A, withadditional measurements of the strongest forbidden lines and Fe IIfeatures down to approximately 6700 A. The continuum flux increased by afactor of approximately 1.6 to approximately 2.0 at 23,000 A compared torecent measurements, by remained the same at approximately 11,000 A.This brightening and reddening of the IR continuum was accompanied bystronger H I and He I lines, constant or slightly weaker Fe II and (FeII) lines, and increased extinction to AV approximately 5 magto 6 mag (from AV approximately less than 3.2 magpreviously). The complex line profiles fall into two categories: (1)broad emission and sometimes blueshifted absorptions that form in ahigh-velocity wind reaching at least 700 km/s and (2) narrow emissioncores that may be associated with a low-velocity (equatorial?) wind withspeeds approximately less than 100 km/s. The broad lines in theHomunculus have profiles and equivalent widths similar to the broadcomponents in the know, but they are redshifted by approximately greaterthan 250 km/s due to rapid expansion of the reflecting dust. Thereflected light spectrum of the Homunculus offers a better 'view' of thehigh-velocity wind because it is free of the many strong narrow lines inthe knot. The range of excitation in both the high- and low-velocityregions encompasses He I recombination and Fe II emission, but excludesthe lower ionization required for Fe I, the CO band heads, and theinfrared Ca II triplet, which are not detected. The narrow forbiddenlines indicate densities in excess of the critical densities, rangingfrom approximately 104 to nearly 107/cu cm. Thenarrow permitted lines are slightly broader than the forbidden lines andprobably form in a denser region nearer the central star. All of thestrongest Fe II lines at wavelengths approximately greater than 7000 A,in both the broad and narrow-line regions, can be attributed to cascadesfrom excited states that are 'pumped' by resonant absorption of H ILyman alpha.

Relative Orientation of Angular Momenta in Multiple Stellar Systems
Not Available

Optical Polarization of 1000 Stars Within 50-PARSECS from the Sun
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1993A&AS..101..551L&db_key=AST

Galactic bulge M giants. IV - 0.5-2.5 micron spectrophotometry and abundances for stars in Baade's Window
Spectrophotometric observations of bulge and local M giants from 0.45 to2.5 microns at a resolution of about 1000 are presented. From ananalysis of strong atomic lines of Na I and Ca I in the K band, a meanmetallicity of the M giants in Baade's Window is derived. It isdemonstrated that J-K is a good temperature indicator for both the fieldand bulge nonvariable M giants, and that the relationship between thetwo quantities is the same for both types of stars. In addition, thereis no difference in the surface gravity between bulge and field giantsof the same J-K color (i.e., temperature). A major difference in theoverall spectral energy distributions of bulge and local M giants isthat the classical H-band bump attributed to the opacity minimum of theH(-) ion near 1.6 microns is considerably reduced in many of the bulgestars.

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Observation and Astrometry data

Constellation:Vela
Right ascension:10h37m18.10s
Declination:-48°13'33.0"
Apparent magnitude:3.84
Distance:26.518 parsecs
Proper motion RA:0
Proper motion Dec:0
B-T magnitude:4.196
V-T magnitude:3.872

Catalogs and designations:
Proper Names
HD 1989HD 92139
TYCHO-2 2000TYC 8201-3337-1
USNO-A2.0USNO-A2 0375-11724441
BSC 1991HR 4167
HIPHIP 51986

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